The Belgium ban on burqas and other full-face Islamic veils has miraculously been upheld. The European Court of Human Rights upheld the ruling.

Judges said the national prohibition, which was issued in 2011, does not actually violate the rights of their citizens. It doesn’t violate private and family life, nor does it violate the discrimination laws.

The court has ruled that Belgium maintains the right to enforce restrictions aiming to ensure the methodology of “living together” and the “protection of the rights and freedoms of others”.

The judges did say that the government of Belgium was responding “to a practice that it considered being incompatible, in Belgian society, with social communication and more generally the establishment of human relations, which were indispensable for life in society…essential to ensure the functioning of a democratic society”.

The European Court of Human Rights is the same court who condemned infant Charlie Gard to death, maybe this is an attempt to make up for their screw up with little Charlie.

There were cases brought to the court in dispute over the law.

Two women – Samia Belcacemi and Yamina Oussar – who previously attempted to have the law suspended and annulled at the Constitutional Court in Brussels, brought the first case.

Both women presented evidence on how the ban has harmed their lives as Muslim women, no this isn’t a joke, they actually did this.

Ms Belcacemi said she actually kept wearing in public but took it off it over a fear of being jailed or fined, while Ms Oussar said the law has forced her to stay at home.

The second case was brought by another Belgian woman, Fouzia Dakir, over a prohibition on full-face veils that was put into effect in Pepinster, Dison and Verviers three years before the nationwide law.

She said the law infringed on her right to wear the niqab guaranteed under the European Convention on Human Rights.

The court found there had been no violation of her right to private life.

The Belgium ban on burqas and other full-face Islamic veils has miraculously been upheld. The European Court of Human Rights upheld the ruling.

Judges said the national prohibition, which was issued in 2011, does not actually violate the rights of their citizens. It doesn’t violate private and family life, nor does it violate the discrimination laws.

The court has ruled that Belgium maintains the right to enforce restrictions aiming to ensure the methodology of “living together” and the “protection of the rights and freedoms of others”.

The judges did say that the government of Belgium was responding “to a practice that it considered being incompatible, in Belgian society, with social communication and more generally the establishment of human relations, which were indispensable for life in society…essential to ensure the functioning of a democratic society”.

The European Court of Human Rights is the same court who condemned infant Charlie Gard to death, maybe this is an attempt to make up for their screw up with little Charlie.

There were cases brought to the court in dispute over the law.

Two women – Samia Belcacemi and Yamina Oussar – who previously attempted to have the law suspended and annulled at the Constitutional Court in Brussels, brought the first case.

Both women presented evidence on how the ban has harmed their lives as Muslim women, no this isn’t a joke, they actually did this.

Ms Belcacemi said she actually kept wearing in public but took it off it over a fear of being jailed or fined, while Ms Oussar said the law has forced her to stay at home.

The second case was brought by another Belgian woman, Fouzia Dakir, over a prohibition on full-face veils that was put into effect in Pepinster, Dison and Verviers three years before the nationwide law.

She said the law infringed on her right to wear the niqab guaranteed under the European Convention on Human Rights.

The court found there had been no violation of her right to private life.

What do you think of this story? Did Europe finally do something right?

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