Saudi Arabia gave their women new rights according to the New York Times. This is huge for feminists, oh wait, feminists don’t care about Saudi Arabia. They gave their women new rights by giving them something as simple as allowing women to drive.

The change, which will take effect in June of next year, was announced on state television and in a simultaneous media event in Washington. The decision highlights the damage that the no-driving policy has done to the kingdom’s international reputation and its hopes for a public relations benefit from the reform.

Saudi Arabia gave their women new rights according to the New York Times. This is huge for feminists, oh wait, feminists don’t care about Saudi Arabia. They gave their women new rights by giving them something as simple as allowing women to drive.

The change, which will take effect in June of next year, was announced on state television and in a simultaneous media event in Washington. The decision highlights the damage that the no-driving policy has done to the kingdom’s international reputation and its hopes for a public relations benefit from the reform.

Saudi Arabia hosts Mecca and is one of the “purest” examples of Muslim monarchy according to Sharia law. This is a nation that has been a very bizarre ally for the United States over the years. The only reason is that of the commercial relationship that we have with that nation.

Some said that it was inappropriate in Saudi culture for women to drive, or that male drivers would not know how to handle women in cars next to them. Others argued that allowing women to drive would lead to promiscuity and the collapse of the Saudi family. One cleric claimed — with no evidence — that driving harmed women’s ovaries.

There have been rights groups in southwest Asia that have been trying to get the ban overturned, but none of the seriously feminist movements in the west have protested the ban. The reason the western feminists’ groups haven’t protested is that AC is too sexist here to worry about the truly oppressed women.

But the momentum to change the policy picked up in recent years with the rise of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, a 32-year-old son of the king who has laid out a far-reaching plan to overhaul the kingdom’s economy and society.

The change could face some resistance inside the kingdom, where families are highly patriarchal and some men say they worry about their female relatives getting stranded should their cars break down.

What do you think about this whole thing?

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